It was time to take a load off: I worked my way up to it

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In the summer of 2002, while I was dealing with the issues involved in getting my Master’s diploma mailed to me, I was also looking for a job. Unlike my previous job searches as a high school kid looking for a way to buy hamburgers and movie tickets, this time I was packing two college degrees earned with pretty decent GPAs. I thought there would be tons of employers out there looking for a guy with my pedigree.

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It was time to take a load off: College

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By the time college rolled around in the fall of 1996, my muscular dystrophy had progressed to the point where getting up from a chair was difficult. I had to be aware of what material the soles of my shoes were made of and the type of flooring to be sure there was enough grip for me to do the awkward dance I had worked out to go from seated to standing. In order to stand up, I would spread my feet out as wide as I could to get my center of gravity as low as possible and form a steady base for the upcoming action. Then, I would rock Continue reading

It was time to take a load off: High school

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On June 2, 1992, my family (movers) loaded up the truck (an 18 wheeler) and we moved from Louisville, where I spent my first 14 2/3 years on this planet, to our new home on Sagewood Dr. in Brandon. I remember driving down our long gravel driveway for the last time on that warm, late spring day. The sky was high and clear. The woods that I spent countless hours playing, exploring, and hunting in were alive with the new foliage of their annual rebirth. Continue reading

It was time to take a load off: Birth – diagnosis

I played tee ball for the first time in the summer between 1st and 2nd  grade. The year was 1984, and I was on the worst team in the Louisville Parks and Recreation tee ball league. My memories of those early events are sparse and a bit foggy, but I’m almost 40, and that was over 32 years ago. I do remember having two young guys, probably just high schoolers that loved baseball, as coaches. They had sweet mullets and let us ride in the bed of an awesome Continue reading